• Puff #2, laser cut buckram, wood, origami, 10 x 18 x 15 in.

  • Puff #3, laser cut buckram, wood, origami, 9 x 14 x 11 in.

  • Act Normal and That’s Already Crazy Enough, starched cotton, embroidery, copper wire, reed, 19 x 112 x 14 in.

  • Act Normal and That’s Already Crazy Enough, (detail), computerized, fabric, copper wire, reed, 13 in. each

  • Untitled #4, pleated silk, wood, reed, screen and feathers, 30 x 20 x 12 in. and Biased Point, pleated silk, wood, screen, reed and wire, 36 x 19 x 13 in.

  • Callous, coiled copper wire, reed an aluminum wire, 24 x 24 x 6 in.

  • Backstitch, laser cutter, CNC router, origami, screws, buckram, polyethylene, 13 x 19 x 19 in.

  • Heirloom, laser cutter, CNC router, buckram, origami, screws, wood, 17 x 30 x 30 in.

  • Legacy, laser cutter, CNC router, origami, screws, buckram, polyethylene, 15 ½ x 30 x 30 in.

  • Dutch Shotgun Chaps, Berger Arts Center, Kansas City, paper doilies, fabric, reed, pins, 52 x 28 x 15 in.

  • Dutch Shotgun Chaps, (detail), Berger Arts Center, Kansas City, 52 x 28 x 15 in.

  • Discarded Ruffled Collar, Museum of Arts and Design, NYC, paper doilies, fabric understructure with steel boning and flocking on wood, 10 x 10 x 10 ft.

  • Ruffled Collar, Delaware Center for Contemporary Art, Wilmington, DE, nomex paper, millinery wire, steel hoop boning, horsehair, 1 x 26 x 22 ft.

  • Wanted Series, Pan Kunstforum Museum, Emmerich, Germany, digital prints, each 63 X 44 in.

  • Embroidery Penetrates, Museum of Arts and Design, NYC embroidered through wall, cord, MDF panel, 27 x 88 x ½ in.

  • Embroidery Penetrates, (detail), Museum of Arts and Design, NYC embroidered through wall, cord, MDF panel, each letter 9 in. height

  • Family Air #4, feathers, wood, convex glass, dressmaking patterns, lace, 27 x 21 x 2 in.

  • Family Air #6, wood, flock, lace, dressmaking patterns, feathers, computer embroidery, 51 x 90 x 1 in.

  • Family Air #6, (detail), flock, lace, dressmaking patterns, feathers, computer embroidery, 14 x 18 x 1 in. each

  • Family Air #8, wood, flock, computer embroidery, dressmaking patterns, 27 x 38 x 1 in.

  • Family Air #8, (detail), wood, flock, computer embroidery, dressmaking patterns, 14 x 17 x 1 in.

  • Flat Collar #3, masonite, flock, steel T-Pins, 42 x 84 in.

  • Flat Collar #2, masonite, flock, steel T-Pins, 42 x 84 in.

  • Clothing as Interface: Meeting Point #2, recycled vinyl banners, origami, 12 x 100 x 30 in.

  • Clothing as Interface: Meeting Point, recycled vinyl banners, industrial ties, origami, 12 x 120 x 280 in.

  • Clothing as Interface: Pansori Portraits #1-3, (videos installation view), CStreet Gallery, Laurel, MD, video monitor each 45 x 26 in.

Clothing as Interface: Pansori Portrait # 1-4
In the video portrait Clothing as Interface: Pansori Portrait # 1-4, 2010 produced at the Gyeonggi Creation Center an intercultural interface materialized when the traditional Korean Hanbok merges with the Dutch ruffled collar worn by a traditional Pansori singer. These slow moving images based on 17th paintings fuses very deliberately my own heritage and background with my most immediate environment creating a hybridized version of self. Korea and The Netherlands share a history that goes back centuries. In mid 17th Hamel shipwrecked at the Southern coast and Jan Weltevree stranded in 1627 near Busan. The presence of both left traces on the local culture and through the writings of Hamel gave the Dutch a firsthand account of Korea.

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PUBLICATIONS
  1. Annet Couwenberg: Clothing as Interface. Elissa Auther, Surface Design, Winter 2013
  2. The Secret and the Stitch: Annet Couwenberg Inside and Out. Kathy O’Dell, Textile: The Journal of Cloth and Culture, March 2012
  3. Contemporary Craft, NOW and HERE. Cheongju International Craft Biennale 2011
  4. Fashion Ethics: Wear GoodFashion Ethics: Wear Good. Gyeonggi Museum of Modern Art, Ansan, Korea, catalog, 2009
  5. Future Textiles. Bradley Quinn, Publisher Berg, London 2009
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« MY CULTURAL TRADITIONS ARE ROOTED IN CIVIC RESPONSIBILITY, A WORK ETHIC TEMPERED BY SOCIALISM AND THE CONSTRAINTS OF CALVINSIM »

TEACHING

Annet is a Baltimore based visual artist who teaches undergraduate and graduate courses at the Maryland Institute College of Art. She served as chair of the fiber department from 1989 to 2008 and stepped down to spearhead curriculum in Wearable Technology, Smart Textiles and Internationalization. Annet has developed and taught a diverse curriculum in the fiber department and in Smart Textiles with outside institutions and other departments including the International Collaboration with Willem de Kooning Academie, Rotterdam The Netherlands and organized travel study abroad programs to Turkey, Peru, Vietnam, Spain, Morocco and Portugal.

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annet couwenberg

CV     (PDF format)   |   (word doc)

email me at annetcouwenberg (at) verizon (dot) net

Born in The Netherlands, Annet received a MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art, MI and one from Syracuse University, NY. Telos Art Publishing published a Monograph in 2003. Received a Smithsonian Artist and Research Fellowship in 2014. Has exhibited nationally and internationally, including Gyeonggi MOMA in Ansan and HOMA Museum in Seoul, Korea, Museum of Arts and Design in NYC; Delaware Center for Contemporary Arts; 28th Street Studio, NYC; Contemporary Museum, Baltimore, MD; City Gallery, Atlanta, GA; Decorative Arts Museum, Little Rock, AK; Textile Museum, Tilburg, NL. Reviewed in Le Monde, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, New York Times, Christian Science Monitor, Baltimore Sun, The Atlanta Constitution, Philadelphia Inquirer, Fiberarts. Surface Design, The Journal of Cloth and Culture and Sculpture Magazine.